Glenville Reel

Now that all my own musical aspirations are focused on various live / jamming projects this blog here can return to our regular “mp3 of bands what I like bulk good” type of blog.

First one up isn’t a band per se but a singer song-writer by the name of Loudon Wainwright III who I was introduced to back in 1992. My housemate Hickey produced this battered old 2 dollar LP from 1971, with a funny looking geezer on the cover, and we listened to it about once a day for about six months. I think I was particularly entranced by the guy’s voice. Back then he sang in this high-pitched anxious, slightly pathetic wail, that makes him sound not feminine but definitely not masculine and almost like he belongs to some separate third gender of angsty singer-songwriter. I late found out he was married to a McGarrigle and Rufus Wainwright is his son, so maybe this is why.

I got a hold of it recently and realized I had forgotten all but three tunes – Baby in the House (which is good but formulaic), Motel Room Blues (which I used to cover), and, the 3-part medley ending in Glenville Reel. I had forgotten the other two parts of this but always remembered the end of Glenville Reel:

Take off her clothes and throw ’em in the river

Wash her body and stick it in the sun

Give that gal everything that you can give her

You can give her the bullets if you can give her the gun

Great song. I don’t know why it’s called Glenville Reel, though. Glenville is in West Virginia and Loudon isn’t from there, and it sure isn’t a traditional song so I got no clue. Maybe he just wrote it while he was there.

Anyway I have lately been working on my own version, Glenside Reel, which takes its name from an Adelaide mental hospital. I’ll post a demo on the L and S site sometime in the next few months, maybe, and those who listen to both will be able to hear the resemblance.

MOTEL ROOM BLUES

MEDLEY – UNHAPPY / SUICIDE / GLENVILLE REEL

I’m trying out the audio player, just for this post.

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Tony Gill / The Love in Your Heart

Yo Emma,

What are the defining features of a demo version?

  • Instruments out of tune
  • Hastily played
  • Singer has a cold
  • Pieced together out of stray bits of audio
  • Lyrics still subject to change

Ahem. Without further ado may I present the demo version of a new Luker and Southern number pending your veto:

Tony’s Tune / The Love in Your Heart (Luker / McKenzie).

Plenty of room for you to practice violiny bits and an intended reprise of the tune at the end.

Have fun.

S.

 

 

The Bodhran

I got myself a Walton’s bodharn a while back and Emma recently pained it. It’s going to form the basis of our new album cover.

Here’s some shots, gallery style.

In other news – giggled last night, went well.

So I’m in this folk duo now

See: lukerandsouthern.wordpress.com

I have formed a folk duo with Emma Luker. It was only a matter of time before this happened, I think. I’m going to do my ‘solo’ folk stuff, and she’s going to do her solo Celtic fiddle thing, without either of us actually having to do the lonely solo artist routine. Being on stage with one other person is literally about five times more fun, for me anyway…

We had out first ‘show’ last night at L’hôtel d’Exatorre on Rue de la Roundelle, a two-song intro at the end of La Nuit de L’acoustique Toutes les Etoiles, run by the ineffable Guillaume.

We sounded quite good apparently, despite the table of screaming “look at me” twenty-somethings who chose to sit right up the front in the music room, yelling at one another, even though they had the whole rest of the pub to themselves if they wanted a place to do that. Sound quality improved dramatically when Bob told them to – and I quote – “shut the fuck up”. I bought him a beer.

For Suzy and anyone esle looking for the two versions of the goldfish song, it is here:

https://southernsteve.com/2009/01/19/look-what-they-done-to-my-song-ma/

Anyway the set was all right and we’re both looking forward to doing a few more shows but things won’t really get sorted until I purchase my new banjo later in the month.  Then things will really start to come into focus. “Folkus”, get it? Oh, don’t stop me.

There is a new site, lukerandsouthern.wordpress.com, and all the info on our activities will go up on there.

Oh, and I’m leaving the upcoming shows page here for the time being. I got a gig playing with Soursob Bob in October and various other sideline plans.

But for the most part, this blog will return to being about my home studio stuff.

Cheers,

‘Southern’ Steve McKenzie.

Patrik Fitzgerald – Grubby Stories

patrik_fitzgerald

Come and get yer punk in Woolworfs...

Really, you’d have thought a guy who was like a cross between Johnny Rotten and Bob Dylan would have been more famous. Or, maybe, way less famous. But I don’t think anyone could possibly have predicted that Patrik Fitzgerald (born ‘Patrick’ Fitzgerald) would have been exactly as famous as he was, no more and no less.

Mp3 file: Patrik Fitzgerald – 10 Songs from Grubby Stories (1979)

This guy has been making a right  nuisance of himself since 1975; knocking on managers’ doors, painting his name on people’s cars, crashing parties, stalking people, busking outside funerals,  and playing so many solo acoustic shows in front of punk punters that eventually Polydor went “Oh, alright Patrik, you can have your bloody record contract if you’ll just shut-up!'”And so Grubby Stories was born.

(Disclaimer: story not actually true. I just wanted to make it sound exciting and I didn’t want to copy the Wikipedia entry).

The truth is, my sister came home with a copy of this record one day (after borrowing it off this jerk called Nathan (who I once saw in his underwear (which was red))) and we decided it was just as good as all the other music we liked, and never gave it back.

I’ve spent the last twenty-five years vaguely wondering why no-one else ever seems to have heard of it, except for all the people who have (and they all seem to be wondering why no-one else has heard of it either).

Apparently Patrik moved from Polydor after a few records, and continued to make records which apparently sound increasingly like David Bowie on a bad day. He now lives in New Zealand where he has a Myspace and does solo shows and stuff, and maybe walks on the same bits of dirt that Chris Knox sometimes walks on. But I wouldn’t really know about any of that. I’ve only heard this record.

The story behind this mp3 is that a few years ago I dug this old bit of vinyl out of my cupboard, recorded it onto my computer (before I realised what the earthing wire on the stereo was for) and then sold it for ten dollars just before moving to the tropics.

(Nathan: I lost your record, I’m very sorry.)

Anyway, here is Patrik Fitzgerald, the forlorn pioneer of folk punk, in all his two chord acoustic wonderness. Well, most of it is acoustic, but some of it is played by a band featuring members of The Buzzcocks and Penetration, whom Patrik somehow managed to get to sound a fair bit like early U.K. Squeeze. But the lyrics are the main thing, really; alternately weird and very strightforward, and all delivered with a cockney nasal despair which is truly beautiful.

If you like your punk music strange and offbeat, I strongly advise that you listen to these tunes, at once.

Mp3 file: Patrik Fitzgerald – 10 Songs from Grubby Stories (1979)

The Ten Songs:

  • As Ugly As You
  • Nothing to Do Around Here (with evil children)
  • All My Friends Are Dead Now
  • Adopted Girl
  • When I Get Famous
  • Little Fishes (brilliant song, my favourite)
  • But Not Any More
  • Conventions of Life
  • They Make It Safe
  • Your Hero